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The Bull's Head Hotel, later 1800s

The Bull's Head Hotel 917-921 N. 2nd st. Shown on the 1895 land use map of Phila. Print by Frank H. Taylor..Showing the front(top) and the rear courtyard(bottom).

Re: The Bull's Head Hotel, later 1800s

Not to be confused with the Bull's Head Tavern (current location of Standard Tap).

Re: The Bull's Head Hotel, later 1800s

M Sweeney
Not to be confused with the Bull's Head Tavern (current location of Standard Tap).
True, the Standard Tap address would be 901 N 2nd st.

Re: The Bull's Head Hotel, later 1800s

It was near the Bull's Head Tavern that Thomas Leiper laid tracks in preparation to building his railroad, in 1809. Later, his was the first horse-drawn railroad in Pennsylvania, and the second in the United States. ("The Guide to Northern Liberties")

Re: The Bull's Head Hotel, later 1800s

from the History of Philadelphia 1609-1884. (The " Bull's Head Inn" in Second Street, north of Poplar Street, has an interesting memory attached to it. Thomas Leiper had connected his quarries on Crum Creek with Ridley Creek by a railway, evidently the first ever constructed in this country. He invited several gentlemen to meet him at the " Bull's Head," and there, in the yard of the inn, he exhibited the plan of his railway. Professor Robert M. Patterson, Callender Irvine, and John Glenn were among the interested citizens present on this occasion. "Reading Howell was the engineer, and the original draught of the railway was made by John Thomson, a native of Delaware County, whose son, the late John Edgar Thomson, president of .the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, not long ago presented it to the Delaware County Institute of Science.")

Re: The Bull's Head Hotel, later 1800s

very cool I grew up by the Leiper house and the tracks were still embeded in the road and could be seen when the backtop cracked disintergrated in some spots

Re: The Bull's Head Hotel, later 1800s

Before the folks who created Standard Tap (and then Johnny Brenda's) came along, it was the Bulls Head Tavern. Can't quite recall who the entrepreneurs were, but they were a step ahead of their time. They re-named the pub the Bulls Head, but there just weren't enough patrons to support the project.

After our NLNA board meetings back in those days, some of us would walk over and have a couple beers and play darts. We always had the whole place to "ourselves" ... I'll bet I wasn't the only one who felt this scene wasn't really going to make it, but we were hoping.

I wish everyone could have seen 2nd & Poplar back in those days. Simultaneously, the middle of nowhere but saturated with the feeling that 2nd & Poplar was a key link in the chain.




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